Latest Entries »

Caipirinha (pronounced kie-purr-REEN-yah) roughly translates to “country bumpkin”. It is made with cachaça, an intensely sweet Brazillian style of rum made from sugarcane juice. The Caipirinha is the national drink of Brazil, where it originated, and is a common Carnavale drink. Although it is more difficult to find, it’s important to choose a premium cachaça for this cocktail in particular because the drink is not heavily flavored and a cheaper brand can ruin an otherwise perfect Caipirinha. You may also like the neater Caipirini.

Ingredients:

  • 1 lime, quartered
  • 2 tsp fine sugar
  • 2 oz cachaca

Preparation:

  1. Place the lime wedges and sugar into an old-fashioned glass.
  2. Muddle well to create a paste.
  3. Fill the glass with ice cubes.
  4. Pour in the cachaca.
  5. Stir well.
Advertisements

This article is from artofmanliness.com

5 Classic Cocktails Every Man Should Know

There’s been a trend lately to get back to the old way of doing things, especially when it comes to things we ingest. People are eating organic produce, for example, and some are going as far as planting their own gardens. Many chefs are serving old-world comfort food right next to their innovative dishes. This trend has also entered the world of libations. Drink menus around the country are starting to have more of the old classics included on them. Many mixologists are using these cocktails as starting points for newer versions that take advantage of the plethora of products out there today. Recipe books from classic bars such as the Old Waldorf-Astoria, The Savoy, and the Stork Club are available in reprint editions for the new generation to use. And who can forget Old Mr. Boston? They’ve been printings those books since 1935 and still do to this day.

But you don’t need a recipe book to get started mixing up some of the classic cocktails men have been drinking for decades (and in some cases, more than a century). Here’s how to create the 5 classic cocktails every man should know.

Let’s make some drinks!

 1.  The Old Fashioned

The Old Fashioned is a bourbon based cocktail, but try it with any whisky. You may find you like the sweeter taste of a Canadian whisky, the more sour taste of the Tennessee stuff, or, for some complexity, use rye. This drink uses a short round glass, sometimes called an Old Fashioned glass, after the drink itself.

Put 1 sugar cube in glass

Add 2-3 dashes of Angostura bitters

Add 1 Splash of Soda Water

Muddle (smash) until sugar is dissolved

Fill glass with ice cubes

Add whiskey to the top of the glass, stir

Garnish with an orange slice and maraschino cherry

Notes on Muddling: To muddle just means to smash. You can use whatever is at your disposal. Some bartenders muddle with the back of their bar spoon for light muddling and use a muddler (basically a wooden dowel about the width of a broom handle) for more intense smashing.

Variations:

For a sweeter drink, add more sugar or muddle a peeled orange slice along with the sugar and bitters. For a weaker drink, use less whisky and top with soda water. Use just whiskey, sugar, and bitters to make the Sazerac (swirl the glass with absinthe and dump out before filling for a true one).

2.  The Manhattan

 

Image by larryvincent

Another whiskey based cocktail, more of a variation on a Martini. Where the Martini is gin and dry vermouth, the Manhattan is whiskey and sweet vermouth. And don’t forget the bitters! Angostura or Peychaud’s works fine.

  • 3 parts Canadian or Rye Whiskey
  • 1 part Sweet (Red) Vermouth
  • 1 dash bitters

Make in mixing glass filled with ice. Stir until very cold (stirring is very important to help the ice melt to water it down a bit and make it more palatable). Pour into cocktail glass and garnish with a maraschino cherry.

Variations:

Trade the whiskey for scotch to make it a Rob Roy. Trade with brandy for a Metropolitan. If you desire the drink to be sweeter, add some juice from the maraschino cherries.

3.  The Tom Collins

The Tom Collins is a classic long drink. It’s a cool, summer drink, built over ice and served in a tall, slender glass, often called a Collins glass. It’s gin-based, sweet and bubbly.

  • 1 1/2 oz Gin
  • 1/2 oz Simple Syrup*
  • Juice of 1/2 Lemon
  • Soda Water

Shake Gin, Simple Syrup and Lemon Juice over ice. Fill Collins glass with ice and strain drink into glass. Top with soda water and gently stir. Garnish with orange slice and maraschino cherry.

*Note about Simple Syrup. Simple syrup can be purchased, but it’s easy to make yourself. Heat a cup of water almost to boil and add a cup of sugar, stirring until completely dissolved. Let cool and add to a container for storage. Should be kept in refrigerator. To make bigger quantities, just make sure to use equal parts sugar and water.

Variations:

Trade vodka for gin to make a Vodka Collins, tequila for a Juan Collins, or rum for a Rum Collins. If you choose to use whiskey and take out the soda water, you’ve essentially made a whiskey sour.

4.  The Sidecar

 

A popular French cocktail, as it uses two liquors made in France. Can be served in a sour glass (a smaller version of an old fashioned glass) or up in a cocktail glass

  • 3/4 ounce Cointreau
  • 3/4 ounce lemon juice
  • 1 1/2 ounces cognac

Shake over ice and pour into sugar rimmed glass. Garnish with lemon twist.

Variations:

This recipe is the “french school.” The English school” calls for a slightly less sweet drink, using more Cognac and less Cointreau, about 3 parts to 1 part, and 1 part lemon juice.

5.  The Martini

Last, but not least, we have the Martini. The most argued about cocktail in the history of drinking. Stir or shake? Vermouth or none? Glass or metal tin? The Martini is THE drink that signifies nightlife and cocktails in general. When someone needs to use one image to symbolize drinking, more often than not, it’s the Martini. That sexy glass, clear liquor, green olive with red pimento. Makes me thirsty just thinking about it.

I’m going to give you the International Bartender’s Association’s official recipe, then explain the countless variations.

  • 4 parts Gin
  • 1 part dry vermouth (sometimes called French or white vermouth)

Pour all ingredients into mixing glass over ice and stir well. Strain into chilled cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel over the drink, discard. Garnish with one green olive.

Variations:

The variations on the Martini could fill a whole book. Keep in mind there is no “right” way, only the way you want your drink. I’ll list a few of the most popular.

Vodka Martini: use vodka in place of gin, garnish with lemon twist

Churchill: A Martini with no vermouth. Basically cold gin in a glass. Legend has it Churchill would “look in the direction of France” and that would be plenty of vermouth.

Roosevelt: Two olives instead of one. Even number of olives is considered bad luck by some.

Dirty Martini: Add olive brine to taste.

Burnt Martini: Uses scotch instead of vermouth.

Buckeye: Martini with a black olive.

Gibson: Martini with an onion instead of an olive.

Dickens: Martini with no garnish. No “olive or twist”.

Vesper Martini: 3 parts Gin, 1 part Vodka, 1/2 part Lillet, lemon twist, shaken, not stirred. James Bond’s martini. Also called a 007.

Bradford: A standard Martini shaken, not stirred.

Notes on vermouth: when someone orders their Martini “dry” or “extra dry” that means to use LESS dry vermouth. People will order a Martini with no vermouth, not knowing that they’re ordering a Churchill. Some prefer the “in-and-out” method, which means to pour vermouth over ice into the mixing glass you’ll be using for the Martini and dumping it straight out before adding the Gin. Some will order a “Perfect” Martini, which in the cocktail world means equal parts sweet and dry vermouth. Others will order a “Sweet” Martini, meaning the use of sweet vermouth is preferred over dry. These will be garnished with a cherry.

Notes on garnishes: Traditionally, a single green olive or a lemon rind twist is used. Using a cocktail onion makes it a Gibson. One of the origin stories is, an American diplomat who did not drink would ask that his glass be filled with water and garnished with an onion instead of an olive so he could pick his glass out of a sea of Martinis. There are a few others. No one really knows the truth, which is part of the fun. Some people garnish with pickled okra, jalapeno peppers, pickles, lemon twists, lime twists. The possibilities are endless.

Notes on stirring or shaking: Traditionally, the drink is stirred. Some people believe shaking causes tiny bubbles which don’t allow for the drink to fully hit the tongue, making it unable to cleanse the palate fully between courses of food. Or that it “bruises the gin” making it taste sharper and less palatable. Others claim that shaking is the way to go, that “bruising the gin” is preferred because it releases the botanical oils in the gin and makes for a more floral drink. There is a taste difference, and it is a matter of preference.

These are five classic cocktails, and with the variations, many more. There are many I left out, and some of you will have your favorites that I didn’t include. I tried to choose ones that are classic, popular, easy to make, and have stood the test of time, so you can do it at home. Enjoy, have fun, and hopefully you’ll find an new favorite in an old classic.

The Lynchburg Lemonade is considered by many to be both the go-to refreshing cocktail of the summer, and the flagship recipe for Jack Daniels.  Created in Alabama in 1980 by bar owner Tony Mason, word of the refreshing concoction soon spread throughout the South.

The drink became so hue that Mason sued Jack Daniels after a sales representative from the Tennessee visited his bar, sampled the beverage, told his bosses and allegedly used the recipe to which was considered to be a trade secret to launch a national campaign to promote Jack Daniels. The better version for my tastes uses Cointreau:

The recipe can be made in large or small portions:

1 1/2 portion Jack Daniels

1 portion Cointreau

1 portion Lemon Juice

Combine ingredients with ice in a cocktail shaker and shake well.  Strain into a highball glass filled with ice cubes. Top everything off with lemonade and stir well.  Decorate with a couple of Lemon slices and you are ready to go.

And for those of you that prefer your Lynchburg Lemonade with a cool Australian accent, try A Kiwi in Tennessee.

A Kiwi in Tennessee

1 1/2 portion Jack Daniels

1/2 kiwifruit,peeled

1 portion kiwifruit schnapps

1 portion lemon juice

Muddle the kiwifruit in a cocktail shaker, add the Jack Daniels, schnapps, and lemon juice. Add some ice cubes and shake well.  Strain into a highball glass filled with ice. Stir and top off with lemonade. Decorate with a couple of kiwifruit slices.

The Reverb Crash

This drink was the wining Tiki cocktail from a gathering of Tiki-ologists and documented on the excellent Tiki site TikiRoom.com. Make the drink, check out the site.

By Kick-the-Reverb

Ok -This is what I came up with:
(remember I wanted something that used a lot of grapefruit juice):

4 Oz Grapefruit Juice
1.5 Oz Passion Fruit Syrup
.75 Oz Fresh Lime Juice
.75 Spoon (Not Oz!!) Orgeat Syrup*
1 Oz Light Rum (Cuban or Virgin Island)
1 Oz Myers’s Dark Jamaican Rum

Put in a shaker with half a cup of crushed ice, shake well and put in a Tiki mug – I guess a 14-16 Oz one , add crushed Ice to fill. Garnish with, eh- I dunno – half a grapefruit, ok, no – with a mint sprig.

* You can use more Orgeat if you want – it depends how strong the taste of the syrup is. The idea is to just feel a bit of it. I used Monin brand which is very strong.

This article is from Putney Farm.com the best food and drink site on the web

Well, “when in Rome…” And in this case, “when in Long Island….make Long Island Iced Tea”.

While this cocktail is much tastier than you might think, there is no tea in this drink, and there is nothing “long” about it. “Long” drinks usually denote cocktails that are less boozy and often served in higher volumes, like a Pimms Cup or Dark n Stormy (a Diablo is also a good long drink). Long drinks often make for good summer cocktails, as you can sip them over a lazy afternoon. But with the Long Island Iced Tea, you can sip one over a full afternoon and still feel like you had a Three-Martini lunch…umm… make that a four-martini lunch.

Many ingredients, but most are easy to find or are in your bar right now.

The trick with the Long Island Iced Tea (Latin translation: needus designus driverus) is that most recipes suggest anywhere from four to seven ounces of high-proof spirits per drink (most cocktails have two ounces)- but you really don’t taste the booze. The Long Island Iced Tea tastes good (very good if you tweak the recipe), and goes down way to easy for its own (and your own) good.

Most recipes suggest an ounce to an ounce-and-a-half each of gin, vodka, tequila, rum and triple sec, with some lemon, simple syrup and a splash of coke. We include that recipe below, but it is a bit sweet for most. And while it tastes good, most of the attraction is of the “I can’t believe this drink is smooth with so much booze” category. Our version lightens the drink somewhat (not much) but omits the triple sec and adds more lemon and coke. Usually we don’t mess with original recipes without changing the name of the cocktail. But there are literally dozens of variations on the Long Island Iced Tea (see here, if curious), so whats one more version of the recipe?

 

Long Island Iced Tea and ingredients.

As for the spirits used in the recipe, there is no need for anything special. Decent, inexpensive rum, gin, tequila and vodka will do fine. The real alchemy of the drink is how the spirits mesh, if you add something too good, or aged, it won’t help and may actually harm the drink- and why waste the money? If you do want the best result, fresh lemon juice and simple syrup will work better, but sour mix will work in a pinch. All recipes suggest Coke, and that’s what we use, but any decent cola should be fine. And serve with lots of ice, the dilution helps the drink, and softens the booze (a tiny bit). And in the end, you have a very tasty drink that is a good summer sip. Think rum and coke, but with more tartness, depth and complexity. Just be careful if you have more than one.

 As for the history of this drink, there are simply too many stories to know where it came from. TGI Fridays claims they invented it (doubtful), but bars from Long Island to Tennessee also claim to be the creators. And to make matters worse, the timeframe varies anywhere from the 1920′s to 1970′s. But since neither tequila or vodka were common in the states until the 1950′s, we suspect the Long Island Iced Tea is a more recent creation. But perhaps fittingly, after a few of these cocktails, no one would remember anyway…

The Long Island Iced Tea: (Our version)

Ingredients:

  • 3/4 oz. white rum
  • 3/4 oz. blanco tequila
  • 3/4 oz. dry gin
  • 3/4 oz. vodka
  • 3/4 oz. lemon juice
  • 1/4 oz. simple syrup
  • 2-3 oz. cola
  • Lemon wheel, for garnish

Assemble:

  1. Combine the spirits, lemon juice and simple syrup in a highball or Collins glass with lots of ice. Mix and then top with the cola. Add the lemon wedge and serve.

Long Island Iced Tea: (Classic version)

Ingredients:

  • 1 oz. white rum
  • 1 oz. blanco tequila
  • 1 oz. dry gin
  • 1 oz. vodka
  • 1 oz. triple sec
  • 1 oz. lemon juice
  • 3/4 oz. simple syrup
  • Splash of cola
  • Lemon wheel, for garnish

Assemble:

  1. Combine the spirits, lemon juice and simple syrup in a highball or Collins glass with lots of ice. Mix and then top with the cola. Add the lemon wedge and serve.

Today’s “Out on the Town” features the pairing of two iconic Texas Hill Country spirits, Tito’s Vodka, and Paula’s Texas Orange. Paula’s Texas Orange is an orange-cello style taste that is perfect on the rocks, or acting as a triple sec substitute with a 1/2 ounce injected into your favorite margarita.

Tito’s Vodka, distilled in Austin Texas, is an uber-smooth 6 times distilled vodka that has won numerous head to head taste test contents against the big guys at Grey Goose and Kettle one. The smooth,silky balance makes it perfect for the base spirit to be used for various infusions.

Originally called “The Carolina”, and renamed “The Texas Two Step”, this drink should become a staple in your Martini style drink library. It is easy to make, very refreshing to the palate, and delicately combines the sublime taste of Paula’s Orange with a little grapefruit juice to delicately balance the flavors in a way you would not think would blend together well, but they do quite nicely.

The Texas Two Step

1 and 1/2 oz. Tito’s Vodka

1/2 oz Paula’s Texas Orange

1/2 oz fresh grapefruit juice

Mix all ingredients in cocktail shaker, give it a few good shakes, pour in chilled martini glass, add orange wheel to garnish.

This particular drink is called “The Carolina” on the Texas Inspired Cocktail menu at the El Real restaurant, Houston Texas.  The El Real is one of the best old-school Tex-Mex in town, and is one of the crown jewels in the Bryan Caswell stable that includes The Reef and Little Bigs

 

 

The Fogcutter

from seriouseats.com

Some drinks just beg to be reborn. Jotted in aging bar manuals and cookbooks, they slumber for years, maybe trotted out for the occasional “Whatever Happened To…?” experience before slipping back into relative obscurity. Then, for whatever reason, someone starts paying attention to what the drink has to say, and it’s like talking to your grandparents and really understanding them for the first time—something clicks, the beauty becomes apparent, and before you know it, the drink is everywhere.

While it might be pushing the matter to say the Fog Cutter was obscure—tiki fiends have been batching them up for years—it’s certainly enjoying a new popularity. Victor “Trader Vic” Bergeron first put this drink together decades ago, but now Martin Cate, owner of Forbidden Island Tiki Lounge in Alameda, California is giving it new life. Cate listed this drink as his selection for Food & Wine Cocktails 2008, and is such a fan that he’s even registered the drink’s name on his car’s license plate.

A couple of the Bay Area’s best food & drink bloggers have recently lauded the Fog Cutter, and with good reason: it’s a delicate, fruity blend of several spirits and juices, topped with an aromatic float of amontillado sherry. Be forewarned, though, it does pack a punch. As Vic wrote of his creation, “Fog Cutter, hell. After two of these, you won’t even see the stuff.”

About the author: Paul Clarke blogs about cocktails at The Cocktail Chronicles and writes regularly on spirits and cocktails for Imbibe magazine. He lives in Seattle, where he works as a writer and magazine editor.

Ingredients

  • 2 ounces fresh orange juice
  • 1 ounce fresh lemon juice
  • 1/2 ounce orgeat (almond syrup)
  • 1 1/2 ounces white rum
  • 1/2 ounce gin
  • 1/2 ounce brandy
  • 1/2 ounce Amontillado sherry

Procedur

Add everything except sherry to a cocktail shaker and fill with ice. Shake well and strain into an ice-filled highball glass. Carefully pour the sherry on top of the drink; garnish with a sprig of mint.

The Rumchata Mudslide

from miaminewtimes.com

Having spent five years in Mexico, I am an horchata lover. Fortunately, the recent influx of Mexican restaurants to Miami has made it easier to find this sweet refresher locally. Some versions are better than others, but that is a different entry….

Horchata is a sweet cold beverage made from rice, cinnamon, sugar, vanilla and milk or cream. It’s a great thirst quencher that helps with the counter effects of eating too many tacos with salsa verde. How can they make this already perfect beverage better? Add rum of course! Thanks to the kindness of master blender Thomas Maas of Agave Loco Brands I was able to get my hands of some of his highly anticipated RumChata. Let the tasting begin!

RumChata combines real dairy cream horchata with five-times distilled premium Caribbean rum. This after-dinner drink (or any-time-of-day) is rich and creamy in flavor with hints of vanilla and a definite rum kick. Try it the “tipico” way and serve it straight up on ice. For those of us with a real sweet tooth the RumChata Mudslide recipe gets a thumbs up. After two of these I was sliding right into my bed.

RumChata Mudslide

1 part RumChata
1 part Kahlua
serve over ice

Blackberry Rum Runner

Ingredients:
– 1-1/2 oz Mount Gay Eclipse Rum
– 1/2 oz Banana Liqueur
– Splash of pineapple juice
– Splash of orange juice
– 1/2 oz Monin Blackberry Syrup
– 3 fresh blackberries
– Splash of Sprite

Pour the first five ingredients, along with two of the blackberries, into a cocktail shaker with enough ice to fill a 14-ounce beverage glass. Shake. Pour into beverage glass and top with Sprite. Garnish with the reserved blackberry and a straw. (Cocktail created by Bonefish Grill, 2202 North West Shore Boulevard, Tampa, FL 33607)

About Bonefish Grill: The restaurant specializes in market fresh fish cooked to perfection over a wood-burning grill. Bonefish’s commitment to quality finds Bonefish Grill culinary leaders traveling the globe in search of traditional and unique varieties of fish such as Icelandic Arctic Charr, Florida Grouper and Wild Alaskan Sockeye Salmon at the peak of their seasons.

This recipe and article is from Putneyfarm.com……a GREAT site with some very cool cocktail recipes.

The Margaret Rose. A good intro to “Daisy” cocktails.

This week’s cocktail takes us back to the classics. The Margaret Rose is a well-balanced cocktail made of gin, Calvados (or Applejack, in a pinch), Cointreau, lemon juice and grenadine. The Margaret Rose is smooth, with clear apple flavor and a very tasty sweet / tart combination from the lemon and the Cointreau. The gin adds some depth and complexity. The grenadine adds more sweetness and the rosy color. This drink is easy to make, works well in any season and is a good introduction to a class of cocktails known as “Daisies”. More on that in a bit.

This recipe first appears in print in “The Cafe Royal Cocktail Book“, a 1937 book that came out a year or so after the more famous Savoy Cocktail Book. In a nutshell, the Savoy book was written by an American Harry Craddock, working in the UK. The UK Bartenders Guild thought that the Savoy book was perhaps a bit too “American” and came out with their own cocktail guide, The Cafe Royal. Both are good cocktail books and each has some unique recipes. For whatever reason, the Savoy is a more popular modern reference. Maybe it’s the illustrations.

We found this recipe and notes on the Cafe Royal Cocktail Book from Cocktail Virgin Slut, one of the better cocktail blogs. We tried the Margaret Rose and liked it (Carolyn gave it a nod, and she is normally not a lover of brandy) and decided to do some more research. The Margaret Rose is from a class of cocktails known as “daisies”. Daisies are one of the oldest types of cocktails and were common in the 19th century. Definitions vary, but a daisy usually combines brandy, citrus juice (normally lemon) and a sweet liqueur like Cointreau or Chartreuse. Other spirits like whisky, gin or rum may be part of the recipe. A good combination, and a clear precursor to “Sours” like the Sidecar and, much later, the Cosmopolitan.

As for the ingredients, the only somewhat “rarefied” ingredient is the Calvados. Calvados is simply apple brandy from the Lower Normandy region of France. Most Calvados is dry, but features clear apple notes and a touch of heat from the alcohol (depending on the quality of the Calvados). American apple brandy, known as Applejack, tends to run a touch sweeter and more tangy than Calvados. Applejack will work well in this recipe, but the drink will be a bit different. Regardless, there are literally hundreds of cocktails (mostly 19th and early 20th century) that feature apple brandy, so Calvados or Applejack are a worthwhile addition to your bar.

In the end, the Margaret Rose is a good drink to try. It is a good excuse to get some apple brandy, try a “daisy’ cocktail and even get a copy of a cool (if somewhat obscure) cocktail book. Nothing like a bit of history. Or you can ignore the history and just make the drink and enjoy it. That also works pretty well.

The Margaret Rose:

Ingredients:

  • 1 oz. dry gin
  • 1 oz. Calvados (or Applejack)
  • 1/2 oz. Cointreau
  • 1/2 oz. lemon juice
  • 2 dashes grenadine

Assemble:

  1. Combine all the ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake thoroughly and strain into a chilled cocktail glass, coupé or flute. No garnish. Serve.
Related articles