The story of how the French 75 became popular and received it’s name is said to be that it created by Harry MacElhone for returning WWI fighter pilots. It is named after an artillery gun called the French 75 which, like the drink, was known for it’s kick.This drink can also be made with brandy in place of the gin and there is some question as to which version is the real French 75, but gin is the more common now. To add another twist, if the same drink is made with vodka for the base spirit, it is a French 76.

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 oz lemon juice
  • 1 oz gin
  • 1/2 oz Cointreau
  • Champagne

Preparation:

  1. Pour the lemon juice or gin and Cointreau into a cocktail shakerwith ice cubes.
  2. Shake well.
  3. Strain into a chilled Champagne flute.
  4. Carefully add the Champagne.

The Wondrich Report

The 75-millimeter M1897, a light, potent little gun with a vicious rate of fire, was the mainstay of the French field artillery in World War I. Hence the drink. Of all the many champagne-and-liquor combinations known to contemporary mixology, this one has the most √©lan. Two of these and you’d fight to defend Madonna’s honor. The drink was a favorite of the Lost Generation — hell, there’s enough alcohol in it to give even Hemingway a buzz.

Most modern recipes lowball the gin; one online compendium cuts it down to 1/4 ounce. For shame. Nor should one adulterate this old soldier with Cointreau or the like. No shame, however, in leaving out the gin entirely — as long as you replace it with brandy or cognac (yielding a King’s Peg, although often recipes for these omit the lemon and sugar).

Read more: http://www.esquire.com/drinks/french-75-drink-recipe#ixzz214LmHdy7